Sangiovese, a close up

Sangiovese

Italy’s gastronomic tradition is an endless source of new and old tastes. Italy’s wines are equally praised by everybody and as such, I could not go on for a minute longer without posting about Romagna’s most typical wine : Sangiovese.

A Sunday evening at Condé:

I came across Condé thanks to Valentina and Luca, who we met for a Sunday evening apéritif at Condé’s  citadella in Fiumana di Predappio (map here).

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Sangiovese is one of the oldest types of grape known in the art of wine making  (traced back to Roman times). It is traditionally cultivated in Romagna, but has also spread to other parts of Italy (and the world). It is mostly known as part of the blend used to make Chianti. In Romagna it is used alone to make “Sangiovese” which is characterized by a certain degree of acidity and moderate alcohol, and usually found on any true Romaglonan table.

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Condés’ production of Sangiovese begun in 2001. The chosen place was Predappio; for centuries the land of Sangiovese, and the goal was that of making a “great, pure Sangiovese of the highest quality”.  As I was able to find out, the end product is a single label with its own name in three versions: Doc, Superiore and Riserva. They export all over the world.collage 3

Condé’s restaurant is located up in the hills amidst the very vineyards that produce its wine. It has a huge terrace overlooking the wonderful countryside.  We had a Sangiovese Rosé, accompanied with an aperitif including the usual regional affetati, with some marmalade and honey and some excellent warm piadina and crescenta.

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Italy is definitely a great subject to blog about. Condé was a great  way to experience Sangiovese, from a closer up (Thank you again to my two great wine gurus!) .  If you are looking for somewhat of an unusual trip around Romagna I would definetly recommend to pull out of the road for an evening at this place.

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2 thoughts on “Sangiovese, a close up

  1. Pingback: Roast Chestnuts and Pere Volpine. | The Gourmand Traveller

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